Screening and Identification of Children and Adolescents at Risk for Depression During a Diabetes Clinic Visit

  1. Fran R. Cogen, MD, CDE

Abstract

In Brief

Among patients with type 1 or type 2 diabetes, depression is one of the most commonly occurring comorbid conditions. A dual diagnosis of depression and diabetes has been linked to poor adherence and decreased daily diabetes self-care and often leads to suboptimal metabolic control and increased diabetes-related complications. Pediatric diabetes clinicians are in a unique position to identify behavior changes over time and provide early identification and preventive intervention for children and adolescents at risk for depression. This article provides an overview of the differential diagnosis process that pediatric clinicians face and practical advice for providers when evaluating and addressing depressive symptoms during routine diabetes clinic visits.

Footnotes

  • All of the authors are based in Washington, D.C. Maureen Monaghan, PhD, is a psychologist at Children's National Medical Center Department of Psychology, Childhood and Adolescent Diabetes Program. Chandra Singh, BS, is a medical student completing a research fellowship sponsored by the Society for Pediatric Research at the Children's National Medical Center. Randi Streisand, PhD, CDE, is the director of psychology research and services for the Childhood and Adolescent Diabetes Program at the Children's National Medical Center and an associate professor in psychiatry and pediatrics at George Washington University School of Medicine and Health Sciences. Fran R. Cogen, MD, CDE, is the director of the childhood and adolescent diabetes program in the Children's National Medical Center Department of Endocrinology and Diabetes and an associate professor of pediatrics at George Washington University School of Medicine and Health Sciences.

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